John McAfee’s Ghost Distributed Exchange Now Live

John McAfee’s Ghost Distributed Exchange Now Live

John McAfee’s controversial Ghost distributed exchange, which promises anonymity, is now live.

[ihc-hide-content ihc_mb_type=“show“ ihc_mb_who=“reg“ ihc_mb_template=“1″ ]

John McAfee’s controversial Ghost distributed exchange is now live, the cryptocurrency advocate announced on Twitter over the weekend.

The Ghost distributed exchange is related to McAfee’s privacy project Ghost, a Proof of Stake privacy coin intended for more anonymous transactions. McAfee clarified on social media that Ghost will replace the McAfeeDEX distributed exchange. The Ghost main net itself is expected to go live on June 22.

Ghost has been the subject of contention for months especially after McAfee himself admitted Ghost “copy-pasted” parts of its white paper from PIVX. Even so, he seemed poised to sue PIVX–an open-sourced protocol–for defamation. PIVX is also planning to use a zk-SNARKs-based privacy protocol created by privacy coin Zcash (ZEC). It will launch in the fourth quarter of this year.

“PIVX is attempting to claim that their source code is Public Domain, but that the description of how it all works (The White Paper) is not,” he tweeted in May. “Claiming a procuct is open source while witholding the documention is fraud. Pure and simple. I will soon demonstrate that in the courts.” PIVX, however, told Cointelegraph it cannot be sued because it is not a legal entity and no one person has ownership of its development. 

The British-American McAfee has been living “in exile” since 2019 due to alleged tax-reporting charges.


Zur Quelle
[/ihc-hide-content]

John McAfee’s controversial Ghost distributed exchange, which promises anonymity, is now live.

McAfee’s Privacy Coin Ghost Is Plagiarized, PIVX Developers Claim

McAfee’s Privacy Coin Ghost Is Plagiarized, PIVX Developers Claim

John McAfee’s side insists they forked PIVX, which is an open-source blockchain

[ihc-hide-content ihc_mb_type=“show“ ihc_mb_who=“reg“ ihc_mb_template=“1″ ]

John McAfee’s anonymity-oriented Ghost project has largely plagiarized its whitepaper, according to developers of privacy coin PIVX.

“After a detailed investigation, it is obvious the GHOST whitepaper was plagiarized extensively from an outdated 2018 PIVX whitepaper,” PIVX tweeted on May 17.

PIVX developers went on to conclude that “at least 20 of the 26 total pages” of the Ghost whitepaper “contain material directly plagiarized from the 2018 PIVX whitepaper,” attaching a number of screenshots to back their claims.

“PIVX is a MIT licensed, open-source project,” a representative for the blockchain told Cointelegraph, arguing that it can be forked “as long as copyright credits are maintained in the code.”

As PIVX spokesperson further told Cointelegraph, their main concern is “to make sure people know that they are investing in a project with a Whitepaper that is full of technical inaccuracies”. They elaborated:

“Specifications mentioned in Ghost whitepaper align with the Zerocoin Protocol, which is not only outdated, but cryptographically flawed and can be exploited. Furthermore, they seem to be unknowingly mixing the outdated Zerocoin specifications with the Sapling Protocol specifications. For example, Sapling does not use RSA-2048 accumulators and denominations at all.”

The representative for PIVX informed Cointelegraph that they weren’t considering taking legal action against Ghost, but were worried about the ethical problem:

“The ethical and legal thing to do, would be to remove it until they can replace it with their own. Assuming their project is released on GitHub, we will check to make certain that the MIT license is maintained, and that copyright notices for PIVX are kept in place. If not, we will submit a DMCA takedown notice to Github, as we have successfully done multiple times.”

A representative for Ghost told Cointelegraph that their starting code base “is a forked version of PIVX, like PIVX is a fork of DASH”, elaborating: “But we have done a lot of improvements and will continue to innovate and put out amazing products.”

The public statement published by the McAfee-backed exchange Switch echoes that sentiment, alleging that Ghost team initially considered forking DASH, but opted for PIVX because it “has made some awesome additions and their product is better”. It also confirms that “some things having to do with certain technical aspects of the project were minimally reworded, although reworded none the less.”

British-American entrepreneur John McAfee, who is currently living “in exile” due to tax-related charges from U.S. authorities, announced the Ghost project in April. In a recent interview with Cointelegraph, McAfee claimed: “I haven’t paid taxes for 10 years, and I never will.”

According to the eccentric crypto advocate, Ghost will be underpinned by a Proof-of-Stake algorithm, and will be tradable against major cryptocurrencies via atomic swaps on the McAfeeDex decentralized exchange. The anonymity token is scheduled to be released in June.


Zur Quelle
[/ihc-hide-content]

John McAfee’s side insists they forked PIVX, which is an open-source blockchain

John McAfee’s Decentralized Crypto Exchange Launches in Beta

John McAfee’s Decentralized Crypto Exchange Launches in Beta

American entrepreneur and vocal crypto advocate John McAfee launches a new decentralized exchange on the Ethereum blockchain

[ihc-hide-content ihc_mb_type=“show“ ihc_mb_who=“reg“ ihc_mb_template=“1″ ]

American entrepreneur and vocal crypto advocate John McAfee has launched a decentralized exchange (DEX) running on the Ethereum (ETH) blockchain.

McAfee DEX is set to run in a beta release status as of Oct. 7, according to the new platform’s official website and McAfee’s personal Twitter feed.

“Centralized exchanges are our weak point”

On Oct. 5, McAfee’s tweet unveiled the new platform, stating that “it takes time for enough users to join to make it real, but if you play, and be patient,” the exchange can serve as “the door that frees us from Government’s cornerstone of control: Fiat currencies. It can’t be shut down.”

In an embedded video, McAfee argues that the cryptocurrency community faces the question of whether its aspirations are limited to merely expanding the possibilities for pure speculation —  “all about money” — or are about an ideal, namely freedom.

After denouncing governments’ control over fiat currencies and the losses this presents to individual liberty, McAfee turned to the crypto space: “centralized exchanges are our weak point,” he said, pointing to China’s move to shutter domestic exchanges in September 2017.

McAfee continued:

“A distributed exchange can’t be shut down by anyone. Decentralized meaning that nobody controls it, distributed meaning that it is everywhere and therefore impossible to stop. We’ve had privacy coins, that’s the other part of this equation, because privacy coins with decentralized, distributed exchanges is the goose that lays the golden egg for us. We don’t use it though.”

McAfee DEX beta: the details

According to the details released so far, McAfee DEX reportedly will entail no Know Your Customer checks, block no jurisdictions and charge a single platform fee of 0.25% for takers. It will not charge maker fees and will also reportedly be open sourced.

Any ETH-based token (ERC-20 standard) can be added without a fee to the beta version, with more unspecified tokens to be supported in the future.

“Don’t expect miracles”

In his Oct. 5 video, McAfee pointed to the low number of traders currently using decentralized exchanges, considering that this makes them “useless.” For his DEX, McAfee urged users:

“Play with it, don’t expect miracles at first. Play with it until it becomes real.”

As Cointelegraph previously reported, non-custodial decentralized crypto exchanges enable users to trade peer-to-peer, using smart contracts to automate deal matching and asset liquidation in order to allow users’ funds to remain under their control.

As of January 2019, a survey of over 400 international crypto exchanges indicated that decentralized platforms accounted for just 19% of the global exchange ecosystem, and their trading volumes amounted to less than 1% of those on centralized exchanges.

This April, major centralized exchange Binance launched its own DEX on its native mainnet. Other major exchanges eyeing their own DEX include OKEx and Bithumb.


Zur Quelle
[/ihc-hide-content]

American entrepreneur and vocal crypto advocate John McAfee launches a new decentralized exchange on the Ethereum blockchain

McAfee Trading Platform Suffers DOS Attack Upon Launch

McAfee Trading Platform Suffers DOS Attack Upon Launch

John McAfee’s newly launched trading platform was hit with a DOS attack

[ihc-hide-content ihc_mb_type=“show“ ihc_mb_who=“reg“ ihc_mb_template=“1″ ]

Cryptocurrency enthusiast John McAfee’s crypto trading platform was immediately targeted by hackers with a denial of service (DOS) attack following its launch, according to an official Twitter post from McAfee on June 12.

According to the post, the web servers for the “McAfeeMagic” trading platform, were hit with a cloaked High Orbit Ion Cannon (HOIC) DOS attack. Cybersecurity website Imperva describes an HOIC DOS attack as stressing a network by “flooding target systems with junk HTTP GET and POST requests.”

However, McAffee tweeted the same day that the website was operational again. According to the same post, the McAfeeMagic trading platform allows users to trade on 8 crypto exchanges, shadow trade professional crypto traders, and make fiat-to-crypto conversions with an over-the-counter (OTC) desk.

John McAffee also intends to roll out his own “McAfee Freedom Coin” token this fall. McAfee describes his design for the coin as a scheme to make it only intrinsically valuable, with no value derived from any other asset:

“… It is not based on any commodity nor is it connected to the value or behavior of any external item or entity. The value of the coin will always be zero in relation to any other currency yet it’s natural market value is free, completely, to grow.”

As previously reported by Cointelegraph, the Ethereum network experienced serious issues due to DOS attacks back in 2016. Malicious users overloaded the network with transactions, causing the Ethereum network to introduce a hard fork in its blockchain to continue operating.


Zur Quelle
[/ihc-hide-content]

John McAfee’s newly launched trading platform was hit with a DOS attack