China’s Ant Group releases digital copyright platform on AntChain

China’s Ant Group releases digital copyright platform on AntChain

The platform is just the latest product in the fintech’s long-evolving blockchain solutions.

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Chinese fintech Ant Group — which is now poised to launch what could be the world’s largest initial public offering — has announced a new platform via its blockchain business. 

Ant Group spun out from e-commerce giant Alibaba and is the parent company of China’s largest digital payments service Alipay. 

Ant Group’s blockchain business, AntChain, has today rolled out a new digital copyright services platform. It combines blockchain technology with AI to enable creators to securely authenticate and verify all kinds of original content — whether video, image-based or written material.

The platform generates a unique, tamper-proof digital copyright certification and notary stamp for each work that is uploaded into its database. The certifications are designed to be valid for use in copyright infringement and tort cases. The company claims that these services can save their users 95% in costs typically associated with obtaining copyright registration and certification.

In addition, AntChain’s platform incorporates digital ID and search services to help creators to more efficiently track and detect possible copyright infringement. Some 10 million original works are already being uploaded and certified each day on the new platform, according to AntChain.  

One of the early partners in the new platform, which joined during its trial period, is the digital music score copyright distribution network, Shanghai C.C. Music Culture. AntChain’s platform generated smart contracts that record and automatically distribute the revenues due to the network’s musicians and rights distributors.

Since 2015, when it began to work with blockchain solutions, Ant Group has developed its own increasingly sophisticated platforms that join the technology with AI and the Internet of Things, as well as backing blockchain research and development overseas.

Notwithstanding its serious commitment to blockchain, the company also has rebranded AntChain with a fair bit of humor and panache.


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The platform is just the latest product in the fintech’s long-evolving blockchain solutions.

Copycats and Copyright: Empowering Content Creators in the Digital Age

Copycats and Copyright: Empowering Content Creators in the Digital Age

One of the greatest challenges for digital content creators is the ability to maintain copyright over their works, and blockchain tech can help them.

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The narrative around blockchain technology as a great enabler of cross-sector innovation has endured since the technology’s perceived potential was assertively decoupled from fluctuations in the price of Bitcoin (BTC) in 2018.

The game of word association that intrinsically linked Bitcoin to blockchain has evolved significantly since then, broadening the scope of understanding around the transformative potential of blockchain on a global scale, with dynamic use cases permeating a wide range of industry verticals.

The principles of immutability, transparency and efficiency that are deeply ingrained in the fabric of blockchain align with the groundswell of data-savvy citizens who are acutely aware of the threats to their personally identifiable information and are keen to explore avenues to protect their proprietary data. This sentiment also extends to swathes of content creators who have grown weary of the fragmented copyright law landscape and the challenges they face when it comes to maintaining ownership rights over their work. 

Using a decentralized, distributed model built around an immutable ledger for securely recording entries that are consensus verified, blockchain can be the constant that mitigates the risk of copyright infringement. Content creators can timestamp a bespoke piece of original work on the ledger to ensure proof of ownership at the moment of creation, providing a watertight guard against potential tampering by malicious actors.

For content authors and advocates of greater data privacy more broadly, the 2018 implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation, otherwise known as GDPR, represented a firm signal of intent from European Union regulators to prioritize the data integrity of the individual over vested corporate interests.

Under normal circumstances, the two-year anniversary of GDPR this month would be heralded as an opportunity to retrospectively assess the impact of the landmark legislation and celebrate a seismic shift toward a nonnegotiable compliance era for companies. Instead, the two-year anniversary will be marred by reports of regulatory leniency, with the current regulatory framework struggling to command the rigid compliance of the wider enterprise community.

The framework, originally established to deliver a paradigm shift for data privacy, has taken a back seat due to the current COVID-19 pandemic and resource constraints.

With reports suggesting that regulators are confronting resourcing issues that undercut enforcement efforts, the pendulum appears to be swinging back in favor of big business, primarily due to the legal costs associated with defending infringements by cash-rich corporations. 

With regulatory hurdles and damaging public backtracking, most notably the recent reprieve for British Airways following the monumental fine levied at the aviation giant last year, GDPR’s star is fading. While the deferral of noncompliance fines and penalty extensions is somewhat understandable given the current challenges confronting the enterprise community, this regulatory latitude being afforded to businesses will likely undermine GDPR enforcement in the long term and is already prompting dissent among commentators keen to uphold the vision of full regulatory compliance.

Fortunately, the latest technological innovations, particularly within the burgeoning blockchain space, can be harnessed to greatly enhance copyright protection pertaining to digital assets such as videos, images and music. In fact, blockchain is already being leveraged in this context at the highest levels of industry and government.

The deployment of blockchain can go a long way toward alleviating pressures stemming from the fragmented copyright law landscape, enabling greater clarity around content ownership. It can also be a tool to help regulators strike the delicate balance between rigid enforcement of rules and encouraging a continuation of content and technological innovation. 

China’s internet courts have prioritized the deployment of blockchain technology to provide safeguards to protect creative content creators, particularly from an evidence-collation point of view — an effort to uphold the legal rights of authors who publish work online. This represents the latest embrace of blockchain technology in Chinese courtrooms, following a 2018 ruling by China’s Supreme Court allowing blockchain to legally authenticate evidence. 

At a time when popular apps such as TikTok are empowering a global community of new content creators, how apropos that the platform itself provides a showcase example of how blockchain can be used to strengthen intellectual property protection. Recently, TikTok brought a copyright infringement case against Chinese tech firm Baidu after Baidu replicated the TikTok platform by launching a similar app called Huopai. A video that had previously been uploaded to TikTok was subsequently made available to download on Huopai, a clear case of copyright infringement. To settle the case, TikTok officials were able to point to data stored on an immutable ledger that affirmed the authenticity of their claim, demonstrating the critical role blockchain can play in combating piracy and bolstering rights claims. 

Other social creator platforms such as OGQ have recognized how blockchain can be utilized as a means of helping content creators maintain copyright ownership over their works. Blockchain imbues a sense of confidence among content generators, delivering advanced levels of protection and verification for hundreds of millions of users’ digital assets. Additionally, the use of ledger-enabled digital tokens can open up new avenues for content creators to buy and sell bespoke digital assets and ensure a secure transfer of ownership.

While recent GDPR backtracking optically damages the framework’s far-reaching authority, the GDPR-inspired California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 is still having a positive effect, with up to $55 billion expected to be spent on compliance-strengthening measures in California alone, including blockchain-powered solutions. 

As we adjust to a new normal — the post-pandemic world — the data privacy and copyright law landscape will be primed and ready for a phase of recalibration, both from a regulatory and technological perspective. Blockchain has the potential to be the agent of change that helps accelerate and streamline key copyright processes, addressing some of the most prevalent challenges for digital content creators while adding much-needed fuel to the data protection drive.

The views, thoughts and opinions expressed here are the author’s alone and do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions of Cointelegraph.

Andy Ji is the co-founder of Ontology, a high-performance public blockchain and distributed collaboration platform. Andy currently serves as deputy secretary-general of China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology’s Blockchain Technology and Industrial Development Forum. He previously led the blockchain initiative of the Wanda Group, a leading Chinese science and technology innovation conglomerate. He was also deputy director of the China Blockchain Ecosystem Alliance. In addition, he served as a director at Hyperledger, a multiproject open-source collaborative effort to advance cross-industry blockchain technologies. An early entrant into the world of blockchain, Andy contributed to the Chinese Ministry of Industry and Information Technology’s blockchain white paper and standards. He has written several books on blockchain and regularly leads blockchain community events.


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One of the greatest challenges for digital content creators is the ability to maintain copyright over their works, and blockchain tech can help them.

Italian Copyright Authority and Algorand Develop Blockchain Ecosystem for Copyright Management

Italian Copyright Authority and Algorand Develop Blockchain Ecosystem for Copyright Management

Italian copyright authority teamed up with Algorand to develop a new ecosystem for copyright management based on blockchain technology

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The Italian Society of Authors and Publishers (SIAE) has teamed up with Algorand to develop a new ecosystem for copyright management, based on Algorand’s recently launched blockchain platform.

SIAE had already started to develop the project – with the help of “La Sapienza” University of Rome and consulting company Blockchain Core. SIAE has now decided to focus on the Algorand platform for its by design public nature and its high performance.

Algorand uses a pure Proof-of-Stake (PoS) protocol that guarantees decentralization, scalability and security, making it particularly suitable for handling the swarm of metadata and transactions necessary in copyright management. Both Algorand and SIAE are confident that in the near future, blockchain technology will become the cornerstone of the industry.

This collaboration will make it possible to evolve and strengthen copyright management tools and services, ultimately creating new, more open and accessible products, further improving the efficiency of intermediation activities.

Gaetano Blandini, General Manager of SIAE, explained the goals of the initiative:

“To explore the opportunities offered by technology, to imagine a future of solutions that guarantee greater efficiency and transparency to our members […] Our collaboration with Algorand is part of a process of synergy and cooperation with major players in the fields of research and innovation, both on a national and on a global scale. Together we continue to write a story that began 137 years ago and that today embraces the future.”

Professor Silvio Micali, winner of the Turing Prize and founder of Algorand, also said of the collaboration:

“The collaboration between technology providers and companies projected into the future, such as SIAE, paves the way to great opportunities for progress towards economic models that promote inclusiveness, transparency, and frictionless transactions. I am honored by the fact SIAE selected the blockchain developed by Algorand, making it the backbone of its new initiative. I will be thrilled to witness the creation of these solutions, supported by the performance and features we implemented in Algorand 2.0.”


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Italian copyright authority teamed up with Algorand to develop a new ecosystem for copyright management based on blockchain technology

Kim Dotcom’s K.IM: Pursuing Copyright Decentralization in Bitfinex IEO

Kim Dotcom’s K.IM: Pursuing Copyright Decentralization in Bitfinex IEO

Kim Dotcom’s proposed platform forms a partnership with Bitfinex to launch a token that is said to be the “easiest way to generate revenue with digital content”

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Kim Dotcom, the controversial internet entrepreneur and founder of the now-defunct file storage platform Megaupload, is making a comeback in the digital content business. This time, instead of a platform that allows users to download copyright songs and television series, Dotcom plans to use blockchain technology to create a fair digital content distribution market called K.IM.

According to K.IM’s white paper, the proposed project is pitched as a dynamic ecosystem that is “aimed to become the easiest and the most secure way to generate revenue with digital content.”

The project plans to facilitate consumer and publisher transactions while cutting out the middleman with the help of the Kimcoin. Bitfinex, the cryptocurrency exchange in partnership with Dotcom’s platform, has recently announced the sale of the K.IM with the relaunch of its initial exchange offering (IEO) platform, Toikinex.

Project overview 

The K.IM project has so far raised over $2 million from investors and is planned to be fully operational by the third quarter of 2020, according to the project’s road map. K.IM says it aims to fill up a content monetization gap in a market worth over $400 billion.

According to the project’s white paper, the infiltration of multiple intermediaries in the digital content business has introduced an inability to offer content at ultra-low prices. With a business model that gives 95% of sales revenue to content creators, the K.IM platform will aim to boost monetization while attracting publishers to participate.

Some of the key features of the platform include content pricing and entails the use of a file encryption service. Users will be able to pay for content with a range of cryptocurrencies. However, only Bitcoin (BTC) and K.IM will be available at the start.

K.IM will serve as a utility coin that will allow users to purchase content, donate or tip on the platform. The project’s road map also states that K.IM will be issued in the last quarter of 2019, with a token sale on Bitfinex set to take place on Oct. 22.

While commenting on the project’s development, Dotcom mentioned that “combining the internet with Bitcoin gives a real chance of achieving the original promise of the internet,” defining that promise as freedom of speech, finance and commerce. He also added that his main motivation for launching the platforms is to “cut out all the middlemen and sell content and digital goods without censorship.” In an email conversation, Kim Dotcom told Cointelegraph:

“K.im will work on policies, designs, and technologies that attempt to address the many complex issues of international copyright compliance for user-generated content intermediary services and related risks.”

Dotcom also acknowledged that recent technical breakthroughs such as Bitcoin’s Lightning Network have enabled the creation of tokens such as K.IM that can be supported on Bitcoin’s blockchain network.

Will Megaupload cast a dark shadow on K.IM?

Far from the noble intentions of giving users freedom and access to digital goods, Dotcom’s alleged reputation of making millions of dollars by allowing illegal file sharing on Megaupload still casts a shadow on his new project.

For some, it is a little surprising that a defunct platform whose founder has been locked in a legal battle with the United States over copyright claims is now spearheading a project that will create a fair market for content creators.

In response, Dotcom has replied that the technology the project is built upon allows users to sell their content without K.IM’s knowledge of what content they are selling. Therefore, content publishers will have absolute control of their content with encrypted file protection.

While talking to Hard Fork, Dotcom also said that the platform aims to “respect the rights of copyright owners by establishing policies in its terms of use.”

He told Max Keiser from KeiserReport that the platform will implement a content hosting platform with a “decentralized structure,” which will have an API that will enable users to add their servers from anywhere across the globe. Dotcom also added that the platform will “allow users to report” anything illegal on the platforms as a community policing strategy.

IEOs as the new ICOs 

By definition, an IEO entails the partnership between a project and an exchange to sell the project’s tokens through the exchange. IEOs are touted as a less risky alternative to initial coin offerings (ICOs). While an ICO involves the selling of a project’s tokens directly to the buyer, IEO tokens undergo a vetting process that gives purchasers more confidence.

Related: IEOs, ICOs, STOs and Now IDOs — How to Raise Funds for Crypto in 2019?

Also, projects such as K.IM can outsource their marketing as well as Know Your Customer (KYC) and Anti-Money Laundering (AML) compliance to the exchange platform. This makes it easy for project managers to navigate through various regulatory requirements.

For this reason, the K.IM project has partnered with Bitfinex in what Dotcom calls “the perfect partner to help distribute the KIM tokens.”

Given that 75% of IEO tokens have reportedly lost more than 50% of their value, how will Dotcom’s project differentiate its value proposition for a successful token sale? Dotcom told Cointelegraph, “a token sale using Bitfinex was an easy choice.” He added,

“We want to distribute our token as widely as possible amongst the bitcoin community for first and early use of the platform.” 

Exploring the niche

With the increase of censorship from existing content distribution platforms, there is arguably a market for a decentralized and neutral platform like K.IM that will increase going forward. The K.IM ecosystem can revolutionize the digital content industry with improved monetization that benefits creators as well as consumers. 

This can all be achieved while promoting freedom of speech — that is, if the project delivers the promises outlined in its white paper. Furthermore, Dotcom confirmed to Cointelegraph that:

“The token piggybacks off cutting edge open-source technology such as the Bitcoin lightning network and its future integration with liquid tokens. In a nutshell, the token aims to allow for fast, cheap and virtually free micropayments for artists and content creators through the K.im platform.”

Despite the noble intentions of the project and the choice to go the IEO way, certain drawbacks might trigger concern over the project’s success. For example, Bitfinex has been hacked on several occasions. The first instance in 2015 led to a loss of more than 1,500 Bitcoins, and a year later, nearly 120,000 Bitcoins were stolen from the exchange. 

This year, the exchange has been criticized over its affiliation with Tether in possible cover-up of over $850 million in lost crypto. In addition to Dotcom’s past controversies, the legal issues associated with Bitfinex could affect K.IM’s success. 

For now, however, it remains to be seen whether K.IM will be successful in delivering the promise of the internet through the blockchain.


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Kim Dotcom’s proposed platform forms a partnership with Bitfinex to launch a token that is said to be the “easiest way to generate revenue with digital content”

Chinese Citizen Wei Liu Also Claims US Copyright for Bitcoin White Paper

Chinese Citizen Wei Liu Also Claims US Copyright for Bitcoin White Paper

Another copyright claim to bitcoin’s white paper has been filed by Wei Liu, a Chinese citizen residing in California

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Official United States copyright archive data shows that Wei Liu, a Chinese citizen residing in California, claimed copyright to bitcoin’s (BTC) white paper on May 24.

In the filing, Liu claims to have published the bitcoin white paper on Jan. 11, 2008, under the pseudonym of Satoshi Nakamoto, with the title “Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System.” Earlier this month, self-proclaimed Satoshi Craig Wright also filed United States copyright registrations for the same paper and most of the original code used to build bitcoin.

Cointelegraph has not been able to determine who Wei Liu is or the reasoning behind the filing the copyright claim by press time.

A news release from May 21 had claimed that U.S. officials received confirmation that Wright is actually Satoshi Nakamoto, but the news has been met with skepticism from some crypto commentators.

Earlier this month, Cointelegraph reported that the legal validity of Wright’s copyright filings are an object of dispute. Entrepreneur and bitcoin core developer Jimmy Song told Cointelegraph that instead of proving that he is Satoshi, the filing shows “that CSW is a publicity-seeking con-man, but we already knew that.”

The U.S. Copyright Office had responded on May 22 to the clamor over Wright’s new claim by releasing a press statement noting that “as a general rule, when the Copyright Office receives an application for registration, the claimant certifies as to the truth of the statements made in the submitted materials.” The author of the release concluded:

“The Copyright Office does not investigate the truth of any statement made.”


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Another copyright claim to bitcoin’s white paper has been filed by Wei Liu, a Chinese citizen residing in California

Staking Claim on Bitcoin — Does Craig Wright’s Copyright Filing Hold Legal Merit?

Staking Claim on Bitcoin — Does Craig Wright’s Copyright Filing Hold Legal Merit?

Does Craig Wright’s copyright claim prove he is Satoshi or is it legally useless?

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Bitcoin SV (BSV) has had a big week. On Tuesday, its price jumped by just over 110%, leaping from about $62 at 1:14 p.m. UTC to $132 an hour later. Given that BSV had been having a rough time in the previous month, with a number of high-profile delistings, this dizzying price rise must have come as a relief to the supporters of the cryptocurrency and the company that created it — nChain.

And while explanations for sudden market shifts are often hard to come by in the cryptocurrency industry, some within the media pinned BSV’s abrupt climb on the news that nChain founder Craig Wright had filed a copyright registration for the original bitcoin white paper with the United States Copyright Office. Given that this registration identified Wright as „Satoshi Nakomoto“ — a claim Wright has been making since December 2015 — it ostensibly provided him and bitcoin SV with a considerable injection of credibility and authority. So, on the surface, at least, bitcoin SV’s price rise was the result of Craig Wright being seemingly “recognized” by the U.S. government as the true author of the bitcoin (BTC) white paper, and the market rushed to get its hands on the cryptocurrency he now backs.

However, this could show that Craig Wright is trying to ramp up his efforts to intimidate anyone who denies he’s Satoshi Nakamoto and/or calls him a fraud. But even if the filing represents a new peak (or low) in his attempts to browbeat detractors and rival cryptocurrencies, some may argue that this reveals a high level of ignorance and incompetence. The copyright has no legal bearing on attempts to pass off a cryptocurrency as the “real” bitcoin, something that Wright claims he wants to stamp out.

Registering a copyright claim vs. proving a copyright

Wright has filed two copyright claims with the U.S. Copyright Office, with the office officially registering both of these in early April. One is a claim for the original bitcoin white paper, while the other is for most of the bitcoin 0.1 source code, with the nChain press release concerning these registrations summarizing them in the following way:

„U.S. copyright registration no. TXu 2-136-996, effective date April 11, 2019, for the paper entitled bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System, with year of completion 2008. The registration recognizes the author as Craig Steven Wright, using the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto.“

„U.S. copyright registration no. TX-8-708-058, effective date April 13, 2019, for computer program entitled bitcoin, with year of completion 2009 and date of first publication January 3, 2009. The registration recognizes the author as Craig Steven Wright, using the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto. Wright wrote most of version 0.1 of the bitcoin client software, and the registration covers the portions he authored.“

There’s no disputing that these registrations have been filed with the U.S. Copyright Office. Nonetheless, they don’t provide any real evidence of bitcoin authorship, since — as numerous commentators have pointed out — it’s highly unlikely that the Copyright Office required proof that Wright is „Satoshi Nakamoto“ prior to registering the claim.

„This copyright registration doesn’t prove anything about who wrote the bitcoin white paper,“ cryptocurrency author David Gerard told Cointelegraph. „Anyone can file a copyright registration on anything — there’s no checking. You’re just making a claim. Multiple people can claim the same work.“ Indeed, almost anyone could register a similar claim, so long as they have $35 to spare and know how to fill in an application form.

Several renowned figures within the bitcoin community are even more dismissive of Wright’s copyright claim than Gerard. Entrepreneur and bitcoin core developer Jimmy Song told Cointelegraph, „Absolutely not. The only thing it proves is that CSW is a publicity seeking con-man, but we already knew that.“

In fact, such dismissals prompted the U.S. Copyright Office to respond on May 22 to the clamor over Wright’s new claim by releasing a press statement. The key part of this statement is the first paragraph, which reads:

„As a general rule, when the Copyright Office receives an application for registration, the claimant certifies as to the truth of the statements made in the submitted materials. The Copyright Office does not investigate the truth of any statement made.“

As these opening sentences indicate, the likes of Gerard and Song may have a point. „It is possible for multiple, adverse claims to be registered at the Copyright Office,“ the press release added, which also states that someone „who intentionally includes false information in an application may be subject to penalties.“

The press release goes into further detail regarding copyrights involving pseudonyms, once again affirming that no investigations were made by the Copyright Office. „In a case in which a work is registered under a pseudonym, the Copyright Office does not investigate whether there is a provable connection between the claimant and the pseudonymous author,“ reinforcing the assumption that the office isn’t qualified to settle the true authorship of cryptography-based works.

The nChain press release did state that the Copyright Office registered the claim „after receiving confirmation from Wright that he is Satoshi Nakamoto.“ That said, the office’s press release makes it clear that it simply asked him to confirm for a second time that he was indeed claiming to be „the author and claimant of the works being registered.“ So, there’s no indication whatsoever that Wright actually shared proof of Nakamoto’s real identity with the office, potentially contradicting the nChain press release.

What is the reason?

So, if the registered copyright claims don’t or can’t prove anything about Craig Wright’s involvement with bitcoin, the question arises as to why the Australian would want to file them. Well, leaving aside the unproven possibility that he may have been trying to pump bitcoin SV’s price, it’s worth viewing the claims in light of all the recent threats of litigation he’s been making toward various members of the crypto community.

For example, bitcoin podcast host Peter McCormack was served with a claim for 100,000 British pounds (around $130,000), after he had refused to apologize for asserting that Wright was lying about being Nakamoto. Likewise, Wright’s lawyers had also threatened to sue Twitter personality Hodlonaut for the same reason, an action that contributed to Binance’s decision to delist bitcoin SV, likewise with Kraken, ShapeShift and other exchanges and services.

U.S. federal law requires that the authors register a claim in order to sue anyone who violates their copyright. So, in the light of Craig Wright’s certain litigious tendencies, the move would make sense. According to Gerard:

„You need to file a copyright registration to take someone to federal court over a copyright violation in the US. If you do this within five years of publication, it’s taken as prima facie evidence that your claims are true, and the defendant has to show they’re not. But this registration is ten years since the publication, so it doesn’t even have that force.“

Not only does Wright’s copyright claim not have that force, but there are other problems that would get in the way of Wright suing any of his critics or rivals. As many people on Twitter and other social platforms have already pointed out, bitcoin was originally released under an open-source MIT License. This means that anyone is free to reuse, copy or modify bitcoin’s original source code however they see fit, regardless of whether they’re doing so for profit or not. Because of this, it would presumably be very difficult for Wright to sue someone successfully, seeing as how „Satoshi Nakamoto“ — or Wright himself, as he claims — originally declared that anyone could use bitcoin in whichever way they liked.

The difficulties in suing on the basis of copyright claims don’t end there for Wright, who stated in his press release that he has been „dismayed to see his original bitcoin design bastardized by protocol developer groups — first by Bitcoin Core (BTC) in 2017 and then again by bitcoin cash (BCH) developers in 2018.“ Likewise, a representative for Wright told Bloomberg that „he will seek to stop the cryptocurrency community from referring to the original token as bitcoin because it doesn’t currently possess the attributes described in the research paper.“ However, it’s not at all clear how he might hope to achieve those goals via the legal mechanism of a copyright.

As Gerard said, copyright has „no bearing at all“ on the issue of someone giving their own work a name (i.e., „bitcoin“) associated with someone else’s work. „‚Passing off‘ is the sort of thing that trademark law is intended to address,“ Gerard added, „but copyright and trademarks are entirely separate things.“

Indeed, the U.S. Copyright Office states in its May 22 press release that it „does not have an opposition procedure for copyright registrations, such as the procedures available at the Patent and Trademark Office for patents and trademark registrations.“ And make no mistake, copyright is not the same thing as a trademark, which, as the Copyright Alliance explained, differs from a copyright in that „it’s a word, phrase, symbol, and/or design that identifies and distinguishes the source of the goods of one party from those of others.“ By contrast, copyright covers „the right to reproduce the work, to prepare derivative works, to distribute copies,“ and so on.

In other words, Wright would need to register „bitcoin“ as a trademark in order to prevent other groups and individuals from using this name with their cryptocurrencies and from passing them off as the “true” bitcoin. And it is not entirely certain if his new copyright claim is even registered because, as the Copyright Office has stated elsewhere on its website, „Copyright does not protect facts, ideas, systems, or methods of operation, although it may protect the way these things are expressed.“

Put differently, copyright protects the particular form in which ideas are expressed rather than the ideas themselves. As such, even if Wright could somehow prove his identity as „Satoshi Nakamoto,“ there’s still a good chance that he’d fail to sue anyone else for violation of copyright. This is because unless any potential defendant copies the bitcoin white paper or 0.1 source code word-for-word, there’s unlikely to be any real ground for establishing that a cryptocurrency harnessing similar principles to the original bitcoin is a copyright violation.

Where now for Craig Wright?

Craig Wright’s copyright claim is effectively incapable of working as proof of origin or of acting as a means of silencing his critics. Though the bitcoin SV rally on May 21 would suggest that the copyright claim has actually had some effect, the fact that BSV rose by 110% within only one hour raises some serious doubts as to its grassroots legitimacy.

Still, there is one thing Craig Wright has succeeded in, even if most people within the crypto community still don’t believe he’s Satoshi: He continues to keep himself in the public eye, ensuring that the media continues to write about him. As Song said, „CSW does things for publicity and public manipulation. I’m guessing that since his attempts at fraud using cryptography have done so terribly, that he’s trying to use the court system to force people to accept him as Satoshi.“

The question is, where does Wright go from here? It’s highly unlikely that he’ll follow through with his new copyright claim and actually sue the developers behind BTC or BCH. If he does, he’ll be forced to prove that he is Satoshi Nakamoto, and if he fails to prove this in court, he’ll be at risk of prosecution for fraud (given his filed claim).

What’s more likely is that he’ll continue doing what he does: threaten his belittlers with legal action, without taking his chest-thumping much further. And even if the new copyright adds a little more weight to the legal threats, most commentators believe nothing much will change as a result of them. As Jimmy Song concluded, „Much like his previous attempts, I predict complete and utter failure.“


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Does Craig Wright’s copyright claim prove he is Satoshi or is it legally useless?

Copyright Registrations Do Not Recognize Craig Wright as Satoshi Nakamoto

Copyright Registrations Do Not Recognize Craig Wright as Satoshi Nakamoto

Craig Wright’s copyright registration for the Bitcoin white paper does not mean that the government recognizes him as the creator of bitcoin

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Copyright registrations for the Bitcoin white paper and the bitcoin (BTC) source code by the United States Copyright Office do not mean that Australian computer scientist Craig Wright is recognized as Satoshi Nakamoto by the government, the Financial Times reported on May 22.

The development follows news that Wright filed copyright registrations for the Bitcoin white paper authored under the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto. A news release from May 21 claims that U.S. officials received confirmation that Wright is indeed Satoshi Nakamoto, but the news has been met with skepticism from the crypto community.

A spokesman for Wright told the Financial Times that “the registrations issued by the U.S. Copyright Office recognize Wright as the author — under the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto — of both the white paper and code,” claiming the Office to be the first government agency that recognizes Wright as the creator of the leading digital currency.

However, the claim has no basis in reality as when the Copyright Office receives an application for registration, it does not investigate the truth of any statement made in that application, nor the identities of people registering for copyright. The Office told the Financial Times:

“In a case in which a work is registered under a pseudonym, the Copyright Office does not investigate whether there is a provable connection between the claimant and the pseudonymous author.”

Moreover, the registering the source code does not protect the intellectual property of bitcoin as an invention.

The Copyright Office can cancel a registration application if it is certain that presented information is a false claim and the person claiming to be the author of a work is in actual fact not who they claim they are.

Recently, a scandal around bitcoin SV (BSV) — the altcoin backed by Wright —  placed Wright  at the center of international attention when cryptocurrency exchanges began delisting the coin amid Wright’s campaign to deanonymize one of his critics, so called Hodlonaut.

Hodlonaut targeted the Australian businessman with offensive tweets, calling him “a very sad and pathetic scammer. Clearly mentally ill,” and allegedly participated in creating the #CraigWrightIsAFraud hashtag.


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Craig Wright’s copyright registration for the Bitcoin white paper does not mean that the government recognizes him as the creator of bitcoin

Self-Proclaimed Satoshi Craig Wright Files US Copyright Registrations for BTC White Paper

Self-Proclaimed Satoshi Craig Wright Files US Copyright Registrations for BTC White Paper

Craig Wright has filed U.S. copyright registrations for the Bitcoin white paper authored by Satoshi Nakamoto

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Craig Wright has filed United States copyright registrations for the Bitcoin (BTC) white paper authored by Satoshi Nakamoto.

Court documents show that the U.S. Copyright Office has registrations with Wright as the author of the white paper, as well as most of the original code used to build Bitcoin.

The Australian entrepreneur has long claimed to have written the cryptocurrency blueprint under the pseudonym.

news release from May 21 claims that U.S. officials have received confirmation that Wright is indeed Satoshi Nakamoto, but the news has been met with skepticism from some crypto commentators.

Jerry Brito, executive director at non-profit organization Coin Center, tweeted:

“Registering a copyright is just filing a form. The Copyright Office does not investigate the validity of the claim; they just register it. Unfortunately there is no official way to challenge a registration. If there are competing claims, the Office will just register all of them.”

According to the news release, Wright is making moves to establish himself as Bitcoin’s creator “after being dismayed to see his original Bitcoin design bastardized by protocol developer groups.”

It is believed that Wright is planning to assign the copyright registrations to the Bitcoin Association.

The businessman is currently the chief scientist at a startup known as nChain. The entrepreneur has been known for attracting controversy, with major crypto platforms recently beginning to boycott bitcoin sv (BSV,) the fork of bitcoin cash (BCH) which he backs.


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Craig Wright has filed U.S. copyright registrations for the Bitcoin white paper authored by Satoshi Nakamoto

Platform Takes on YouTube and Spotify to Protect Copyright and Help Artists Make a Living

Platform Takes on YouTube and Spotify to Protect Copyright and Help Artists Make a Living

It can be tough for artists to make a living on mainstream sites, but a blockchain platform says it offers a compelling alternative #SPONSORED

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A blockchain platform is enabling creators to share their music, videos and webtoons with the masses, all while ensuring that their copyright is protected.

ContentsDeal says it aims to simplify the “complicated distribution structure” that is seen across the media world today, a structure which often means it can be difficult for talented artists to make a profit from their works.

The company claims that an extensive range of Korean and global artists have gotten involved with its platform so far, delivering exclusive, limited-edition content to fans.

Changing tune

According to ContentsDeal, the evolution of platforms such as YouTube and Spotify — which enable consumers to listen to music on demand — have been great news for the public but frustrating for content creators. Especially when it comes to young, up-and-coming artists, many of whom have a small following on these platforms, the blockchain project argues that the video-sharing site ends up being a “big loss in compensation for their work.”

Current revenue streams on these platforms often include “annoying” ads which are placed in the middle of videos, or paid memberships which enable users to avoid this disruption altogether. However, ContentsDeal alleges that very little of this revenue ends up making its way back to the content creator.

Indeed, Spotify has been a long-running sore point for artists — and according to CNBC, payments through this platform can vary anywhere between $0.006 and $0.0084 a stream, meaning one million plays of a song would may only generate a maximum of $8,400. Even all of this doesn’t necessarily go to a performer once songwriters, producers and record labels are brought into the equation.

ContentsDeal is available here

The solution

ContentsDeal says it aims to remedy this through a protocol known as Proof of Copyright — or PoC for short. It has already begun to make inroads within the music industry after striking a partnership with the Korean Management Foundation, which works on behalf of big names including Ariana Grande and Justin Bieber. It has also forged connections with the K-pop music industry in the hope that top talent on its platform will encourage others to sign up as well.

“People who participate in the ContentsDeal ecosystem will experience safer and enhanced transparency in their content trade… and get more top-tier music,” a Medium blog post added.

The startup also plans to help the webtoons industry, and claims that platforms have been failing to develop at the same pace as content creators. The blog post adds: “This instability of the webtoon industry structure is counterproductive in regards of growth and fresh content, thus the need for a fair copyright policy is crucial for its survival.”

ContentsDeal officially launched on Jan 29, and a series of events have been taking place to help the platform gain momentum. Users are being invited to take place in a test transaction contest so they can help the company ensure that its system for purchasing and reselling content is fully functional. The startup is also inviting the community to share feedback about their experiences while using the platform — especially if they’ve got any ideas for improvements or have encountered any bugs. Looking ahead, ContentsDeal is hoping to forge new partnerships to enhance the breadth of music, webtoons and videos on its platform.

Disclaimer. Cointelegraph does not endorse any content or product on this page. While we aim at providing you all important information that we could obtain, readers should do their own research before taking any actions related to the company and carry full responsibility for their decisions, nor this article can be considered as an investment advice.


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It can be tough for artists to make a living on mainstream sites, but a blockchain platform says it offers a compelling alternative #SPONSORED

Argentina: NEM Foundation to Develop Blockchain-Powered Copyright System for Journalists

Argentina: NEM Foundation to Develop Blockchain-Powered Copyright System for Journalists

NEM Foundation in Argentina has partnered with a local trade union of journalists to create a blockchain tool to protect intellectual property rights

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NEM Foundation in Argentina has signed a memorandum of understanding with a local trade union of journalists. The goal of the agreement is to develop a blockchain-powered solution for copyright protection, Cointelegraph in Spanish reported Saturday, Jan. 5.

The memorandum signed with CISPREN — the journalists’ trade union of the city of Cordoba in central Argentina — also implies the development of a Proof-of-Concept for the project. CISPREN hopes that blockchain can solve different issues associated with the protection of intellectual property rights, such as content theft, failure to pay royalties and others.

CISPREN’s press-secretary German Guismondi told Cointelegraph that authors will be able to upload their content to blockchain, in the process creating a timestamp as proof of authenticity. Each piece of content will have a unique QR code and a digital signature, serving as additional safeguards for the author in case of a dispute.

Blockchain is already being used in journalism as a copyright and content management tool. For instance, last year Forbes partnered with blockchain-based platform Civil to publish its content on the decentralized network of the latter. The media outlet plans to apply decentralized technologies to all of its content and allow writers to publish articles on Forbes and Civil simultaneously.

The Associated Press (AP) also partnered with Civil last August, in order to track the usage of its content with the use of blockchain. The news agency was reportedly interested in whether the technology can help it protect property rights and support ethical journalism.


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NEM Foundation in Argentina has partnered with a local trade union of journalists to create a blockchain tool to protect intellectual property rights

China: Media Alliance to Use Blockchain Technology for Copyright Protection

China: Media Alliance to Use Blockchain Technology for Copyright Protection

Chinese media outlets have formed a new alliance that will use blockchain technology to protect against copyright infringement

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A media copyright protection alliance has been established in Beijing to provide copyright protection services using blockchain technology, according to the Chinese state-owned International Finance News on Dec. 19.

The newly established alliance — the „China Financial Media Copyright Protection Alliance“ — involves more than 30 major financial media outlets such as International Finance News, Economic Information Daily, China Business News, Beijing Business Daily, and the Daily Economic News, among others.

The alliance aims to provide “reasonable authorization systems, improving authorized transaction mechanisms, strengthening industry copyright self-discipline, and developing copyright cooperation in the industry.” Qi Huisheng, secretary of the former Communist Party group of the China Association of Journalists said:

„Reporters and newspapers should establish copyright awareness, solve common problems in copyright protection through technology and other means, and actively communicate with relevant technical teams to protect original copyright…“

International Finance News reports that the alliance will use blockchain technology “to provide original authentication and copyright protection for original works.” The Alliance aims to use the technology to “embed the unique identifier ‘DNA’ in the article.” So long as the article maintains a 70 percent similarity, whether it is transferred through social media or various websites, the “DNA” can be purportedly traced back to the original:

“…once an infringement is discovered, the technology platform will immediately obtain evidence.”

In June, an association of more than 100 mainstream media outlets established the “Global Media Blockchain Alliance” in Hong Kong, aiming to provide high-quality information about the blockchain industry to the public, and create a “healthy public opinion environment.”

Last month, 54 different Chinese companies covering blockchain technology in finance and trading established the Guangdong, Hong Kong and Macao Dawan District Blockchain Alliance. The new group will purportedly promote innovation and jointly develop blockchain technology within the country.


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Chinese media outlets have formed a new alliance that will use blockchain technology to protect against copyright infringement

Russian Intellectual Property Court Trials Blockchain to Store Copyright Data

Russian Intellectual Property Court Trials Blockchain to Store Copyright Data

A Russian court dedicated to the copyright area has stored data on right holders on blockchain in cooperation with a local startup

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A Russian court dedicated to intellectual property cases has successfully tested a blockchain network for storing copyright data. The technology was reportedly used for the first time in the judicial area in Russia, major Russian news agency TASS writes Monday, Dec. 3.

According to TASS, the court recorded a change in a group of right holders, using a blockchain solution provided by Russian intellectual property startup IPChain. IPChain’s president Andrey Krichevsky claims this is a precedent for the Russian judicial system, calling the use of the tech “a definite breakthrough.”

Krichevsky believes that blockchain could help increase interoperability in the copyright market, as it allows all information stored to be kept up-to-date, which is particularly important for the area of property rights.

TASS reports that the court’s representative, Ludmila Novoselova, hinted that the courts’ tech support will further evolve, noting that in five years all the legal disputes will probably be settled online.

As Cointelegraph reported before, IPChain has previously partnered with the Uzbek government to deploy its decentralized solutions in the local copyright sphere, especially in the field of science and invention.

Earlier this year, a similar deal was signed between IPChain and the State Patent Office of Kyrgyzstan to digitize patent records and store them in a decentralized database. Krichevsky has also stated that blockchain projects were discussed with Armenian officials as well, TASS notes.

Spanish public institutions are also exploring the use of blockchain in the copyright area. In July, the Spanish Society of Authors and Publishers and the Madrid School of Telecommunications Engineering announced they started researching blockchain use in copyright management.


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A Russian court dedicated to the copyright area has stored data on right holders on blockchain in cooperation with a local startup