Binance’s Swipe-Powered Crypto Debit Card Debuts in Europe

Binance’s Swipe-Powered Crypto Debit Card Debuts in Europe

Binance Card, a highly anticipated crypto debit card by Binance, will support four cryptocurrencies at launch.

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Binance’s highly-anticipated cryptocurrency debit card, Binance Card, is officially debuting in countries of the European Economic Area, or EEA.

Binance told Cointelegraph on July 14 that EEA-based users will be able to apply for a Binance Card starting in August. While the United Kingdom will follow in the near future, users in other regions are invited to “register their interest” via the Binance Card website, the firm said.

As previously reported, Swipe is currently available in 31 countries within the EEA, including countries like France, Germany, Italy, and Spain, among others. Swipe is not yet available in the United States, but the firm is purportedly planning to release the service soon after completing appropriate licensing and registrations.

Four cryptos available at the launch

According to the announcement, Binance Card will support a total of four cryptocurrencies at the launch. Those cryptos include Bitcoin (BTC), Swipe’s native SXP token, as well as Binance’s native token BNB and stablecoin, Binance USD (BUSD).

According to the announcement, the Binance Card rollout will allow users to instantly convert the cryptos to fiat and spend them at over 60 million merchants across 200 regions and territories. 

Binance emphasized that the Binance Card will basically work like a traditional debit card and will not require users to manually convert crypto to fiat before making a purchase.

Binance Card users will be able to recharge their card wallet directly from their spot wallet on Binance as well as choose the order of preference to debit their BTC, BNB, SXP and BUSD assets. 

Swipe CEO Joselito Lizarondo explained, „For example, if I have 50 euros in BTC and 50 euros in BNB, if I made a transaction for 75 euros, it would be approved and then it would deduct my crypto in the order I selected.“ 

The Swipe platform will enable users to store their cryptocurrency on their card wallet and only convert them to fiat currencies when a transaction is taking place.

Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao said that Binance Card will greatly contribute to the adoption of crypto around the world:

“By providing a tangible way to transact, convert and spend crypto for everyday use, we are furthering our mission of making crypto more accessible to the masses. Giving users the ability to convert and spend their crypto directly with merchants around the world, will make the crypt experience more seamless and applicable.”

Last week, Zhao demonstrated the first Binance Card transactions, officially confirming that Binance Card will be powered by Swipe. Binance acquired Swipe just earlier this month, marking its second acquisition this year.


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Binance Card, a highly anticipated crypto debit card by Binance, will support four cryptocurrencies at launch.

Cardano to Undergo Network Upgrade in Preparation for Shelley

Cardano to Undergo Network Upgrade in Preparation for Shelley

Cardano is getting ready for its highly anticipated network upgrade that will remove the “training wheels” from the network and let the community decide on block validators

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The Cardano (ADA) network will perform a scheduled upgrade on Feb. 20 to introduce Ouroboros BFT, an improved consensus mechanism. The update is an intermediate step between the current Byron era and Shelley, which will introduce staking on mainnet.

Announced by IOHK on Feb. 19, the upgrade will be executed on Thursday at 9:44 PM UTC, or 4:44 PM EST. The network will undergo a hard fork, though the team emphasizes that “it is a planned and managed protocol upgrade.”

What is Ouroboros BFT?

The new protocol is a development over the original Ouroboros “Classic,” which is currently active on Cardano’s mainnet. While Ouroboros is a provably secure proof-of-stake consensus protocol, the original version made several compromises in decentralization. Namely, the list of validators is currently fixed and their succession is known ahead of time.

Cardano’s Shelley era focuses entirely on removing the “training wheels” and letting the community decide on block validators through staking. It will be powered by Ouroboros Praos, which adds several features to make it much harder to corrupt validators.

In between the two major eras, the Cardano team decided to split the transition into two hard forks. The decision was taken to ensure that no interruptions to network service occur as its validation is delegated to the community.

Shelley timeline

The Cardano team suffered strong setbacks in its Shelley plans. While it was initially planned to be released before the end of 2019, the team was only able to launch an incentivized testnet in December.

The testnet was an important step in preparing for Shelley, helping create a staking community in a safe environment. In the meantime, Cardano is also working on every subsequent phase, such as smart contracts.

Following a commitment to improve timeline estimates, Cardano delivered the hard fork on time. In January, IOHK CEO Charles Hoskinson promised a mid-February date for the upgrade.


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Cardano is getting ready for its highly anticipated network upgrade that will remove the “training wheels” from the network and let the community decide on block validators

Cryptocurrency Grin Follows Through With Anticipated July 17 Mainnet Hardfork

Cryptocurrency Grin Follows Through With Anticipated July 17 Mainnet Hardfork

Grin has completed its first hardfork as scheduled, with the stated aim of continuing to prevent ASIC mining as well as sporting some Grin wallet upgrades

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Privacy-focused cryptocurrency Grin has completed the first hardfork so far on its mainnet. The fork occurred at block height 262,080 on July 17, as shown on the Grin block explorer Blockscan.  

According to an official announcement from Grin core dev Quentin Le Sceller, the latest blockchain hardfork is designed to discourage Grin mining through dedicated application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and also includes a new iteration of its “bulletproof rewind scheme” for Grin wallets.

As previously discussed by Cuckoo Cycle author John Tromp, there is reportedly no sign of users deploying ASICs to mine Grin yet; however, Grin’s secondary Proof-of-Work scheme Cuckaroo29 is intended to be continually iterated upon in order to prevent ASIC mining:

“In the 133 days of Grin mining so far, there is no sign of any ASIC mining. We do know of several ASIC products planned to come out in summer. To the extent that any such ASICs have built in support for Cuckaroo29, we want our tweak to brick that support.”

As previously reported by Cointelegraph, Grin proposed the mainnet hardfork for the aforementioned height and date on June 5. Grin has also planned to continue hardforking its mainnet at regular intervals, with each fork occurring approximately once every six months upon reaching 262,080 new blocks. 

As these are hardforks, previous transactions on the blockchain will no longer be recognized whenever a new mainnet version is launched. Additionally, Grin apparently uses the “Mimblewimble” protocol, a cryptographic protocol named after a tongue-tying curse from the popular Harry Potter fantasy series. This protocol reportedly allows for transactions to be obfuscated, with the upshot of maintaining user privacy and guarding against double spending.


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Grin has completed its first hardfork as scheduled, with the stated aim of continuing to prevent ASIC mining as well as sporting some Grin wallet upgrades